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Sep 06, 2018

When it comes to digital privacy, the U.S. is riding in a car without a seatbelt. A poor choice with long-range impact. The tech industry could unintentionally set precedent for other industries with its frugal acceptance of regulations.

Google, Microsoft, Facebook and IBM are lobbying the Trump administration for a federal privacy law in a bid to overrule California’s newly minted state privacy bill. The language, similar to that of GDPR, is too aggressive for their liking.

While big tech views the majority of regulations as a threat, privacy is a simpler issue. GDPR, like California’s Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, boils down to having a granular level understanding of where sensitive data lives and how efficiently it can be accessed.

When it comes to digital privacy, the U.S. is riding in a car without a seatbelt. A poor choice with long-range impact. The tech industry could unintentionally set precedent for other industries with its frugal acceptance of regulations.

Google, Microsoft, Facebook and IBM are lobbying the Trump administration for a federal privacy law in a bid to overrule California’s newly minted state privacy bill. The language, similar to that of GDPR, is too aggressive for their liking.

While big tech views the majority of regulations as a threat, privacy is a simpler issue. GDPR, like California’s Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, boils down to having a granular level understanding of where sensitive data lives and how efficiently it can be accessed.

It’s understandable big tech isn’t welcoming to a policy change that could aggravate its authority.

The seemingly more laissez-faire approach to digital privacy comes down to a cultural difference between the states and the European Union. Compared the EU, the U.S. is a more “litigation-happy society” and a courtroom can be the last obstacle, according to Corr.

At some point, however, organizations need checks and balances to make sure they are fair and safe.

“The world of technology has been one hell of a great place,” and because of the standards it creates and essentially sets for itself, its influence over other industries is notable and alarming, according to Corr.

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